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Addicted to Self Will?

[fa icon="calendar'] Jan 11, 2017 9:00:00 AM / by Kara F posted in Alcoholics Anonymous, addiction, big book, self-will

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 Hello my name is Kara and I am addicted to self-will!

Page 62 of the Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous states “So our troubles, we think , are basically of our own making.  They arise out of ourselves, and the alcoholic is an extreme example of self-will run riot”…..um….bummer!  I don’t know about you but I have never lived in peace and riot at the same time.  Of course, I have given it one heck of an effort, but the 2 don’t mesh.  Ultimately, through experiencing both peace and unrest, I decided I would like to choose peace.  It’s one or the other. And I like peace!

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The Tenth Step Revisited

[fa icon="calendar'] Oct 15, 2015 4:35:00 PM / by Dick Rice posted in alcohol addiction, drug addiction, Alcoholics Anonymous, recovery process

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Back in the early 1970’s, I had the opportunity to be summer pastor at a small church in Struble, Iowa, just north of LeMars.  There was little to no night life and I quickly became the gathering place for the adolescents of the town.  Night after night, as July gave way to August, they would appear, telling their tales of “walking the beans” or “walking the corn” that day.   As a city boy, I had no idea what they were talking about until they actually took me out to a field and invited me to “walk the beans’ with them.  I was amazed at the number and variety of weeds that were growing up with the crops.   I was also surprised at how quickly the work became tedious and taxing, necessary as it was.  

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Focusing on What Works - 12 Steps of AA & Abstinence

[fa icon="calendar'] Oct 12, 2015 9:13:47 AM / by Staff Blog posted in drug addiction, Alcoholics Anonymous, AA, 12 step program

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The 12 step program is a framework for confronting problems that involve addiction, alcoholism, and pressure. Sometimes referred to as spiritual methods, the Alcoholics Anonymous(AA) program was originally started due to a text that was published in 1939. The text, Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism, created the foundation that paved the way for the 12 step program of AA. Today this method is regarded as the most successful practice of abstinence

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Coincidences are God's Way of Remaining Anonymous.

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 23, 2015 9:30:00 AM / by John MacDougall posted in Alcoholics Anonymous, higher power, hope, alcohol recovery, god

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Many of us begin our recovery as “functional agnostics”. That is, we may say we believe in a Higher Power, but we function as if we were on our own. It would be convenient if our Higher Power would show up and do something miraculous so that we could believe. It’s easy to assume that God, if there is one, should give us a “white light experience” so that we can believe.

Sometimes that happens. AA's co-founder, Bill W. had just such a miraculous experience. He had a sudden, overwhelming encounter with God, and did not doubt again. AA's other co-founder, Dr. Bob, had the educational variety of religious experience, in which he learned about his Higher Power over a period of time. This slower form is by far the most common in recovery.

One way to research whether there is an active Higher Power in our lives, is to begin looking for coincidences in recovery. Each of them could, by itself, be just a coincidence. As they pile up, however, we begin to detect the possibility that a Higher Power is at work in our lives. That possibility is scary. We wonder what this "Higher Power" might be up to next. In our anxiety, we sometimes drop the experiment. But when we keep it up, the coincidences reveal the guidance of the God of our understanding.

In treatment, or at The Retreat, we notice the way the “roommate from hell” turns into a lifetime friend; the way the assigned lecture or reading turns out to have just what we needed when we needed it; the way the unavailable sober house bed comes open just at the right time. When I married Priscilla thirty-nine years ago, we were so different that the minister who did the wedding began by saying "I never thought you two would go through with this." Over the years we really discovered how similar our childhoods and original families were, and how much we have in common inside. Of course, this could be just a coincidence.

On our honeymoon, we went off to a lonely corner of the Atlanta Airport between the two flights to our Florida destination, to have some quiet time together. A woman came up to us to ask if it was safe to fly. We told her that we were on our honeymoon, and if we thought it wasn't safe, we wouldn't go. It turns out she was on the run from an abusive husband, and was terrified both of flying and of going back to him. By coincidence, she was booked on our flight, and we rode with her to Florida. I think her Higher Power wanted her to fly to safety.

On my last afternoon working on a men's unit at Hazelden, after my work was done, I met a new patient who was lamenting that no one understood him or what his life was like. By coincidence, he was from a town I knew well. The counseling center he had been attending was set up in memory of my brother-in-law, who died of the consequences of alcoholism. We had a fine talk, he felt understood, and then I went home. His higher power and mine had given both of us a lift. Of course, It could have been just a coincidence.

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What Is Spirituality?

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 21, 2015 1:30:00 PM / by John MacDougall posted in Alcoholics Anonymous, recovery process, higher power, big book, AA, spirituality

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The Rise in Drug Abuse Among Baby Boomers.

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 17, 2015 9:30:00 AM / by John Curtiss posted in drug addiction, Alcoholics Anonymous, sober community, older adults, drug abuse, baby boomers

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Carrying the Message of Hope and Recovery.

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 8, 2015 3:10:49 PM / by John Curtiss posted in Alcoholics Anonymous, recovery process, higher power, fifth tradition, AA, carrying the message, hope, recovering alcoholics

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Choosing Our Battles in Recovery and Avoiding Resentment.

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 2, 2015 10:30:00 AM / by John MacDougall posted in alcohol addiction, alcohol dependency, Alcoholics Anonymous, 12 Steps, fifth tradition, big book, anger, resentment, AA

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“I DON’T HAVE TO ATTEND EVERY ARGUMENT I’M INVITED TO.”

Alcoholics are naturally argumentative, but Alcoholics Anonymous is a remarkably peaceful program. The reason for this is that Alcoholics Anonymous is built on the experience, strength and hope of its members, rather than resting on doctrine or beliefs. The first draft of the Twelve Steps invited alcoholics to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God. The final draft, which was published in the first printing of the first edition, invited alcoholics to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood him.

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Forgiving Yourself to Start Over in Sobriety.

[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 17, 2015 10:30:00 AM / by Pam Broz posted in sobriety, alcohol addiction, drug addiction, Alcoholics Anonymous, 12 Steps, 5th Step, overdose on prescription drugs

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Relapse Is Not a Part of Recovery, It’s Part of The Disease.

[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 10, 2015 1:30:00 PM / by John MacDougall posted in alcohol addiction, drug addiction, Alcoholics Anonymous, recovery process, relapse

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There has been an important change in the way that many people define relapse and recovery. Twenty years ago, when I started working in treatment, relapse was a sign of failure, a failure with a shared responsibility. It was the alcoholic’s responsibility, in that they had picked up another drink, but it was also a time for the staff to question, “What did we miss? Is there anything we could have done, or done better that could have helped this alcoholic avoid relapse?”

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